sangria in the house

sangria recipe

We had some friends over this past weekend and I went a little fruity-wine-crazy for the occasion. I usually default to white wine sangria, but lately I’ve been favoring red wine, so I wanted to give its sangria counterpart a try. Consequently I made too much of each to fit in my fabulous containers that I had no other choice but make a combination of the two.

raspberry peach sangria

One of the perks of sangria is that you need to buy cheap wine. Getting the more expensive stuff doesn’t do you any favors, so go to the “value glass” wine section and pick your poison.  I went for a chardonnay since it was going to get sweetened up. But I found recipes that called for any type of white wine (reisling, pinot, chardonnay, etc)

sangria ingredients

Raspberry Peach Sangria

  • 1 Liter white wine
  • 2 cans* peach nectar
  • 1 package frozen** peaches
  • 1 package frozen** raspberries+
  • 1 kiwi, peeled and sliced
  • sugar, optional, to taste
Mix wine and nectar together. Add fruit. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours, preferably overnight. Gently stir mixture and add sugar (1/4-1/2 Cup) if desired.   Continue to refrigerate and serve when ready!
*I started out with just one can of peach nectar and it was still really wine-tasting by the next day. I ended up adding another can by the time I was pleased with it. It’s really a taste-as-you-go process to get it how you like it.
**of course you can use fresh fruit, it just wasn’t in season/as economical at the time I made this.
+I actually just used half the raspberries so I could use the other half in the red. But if I was just making the one, I would put the whole thing in. There’s no science for the fruit, put in however much you want.
alrighty, onto the red:
strawberry lime sangria
  • Red Wine (I used a boxed sweet merlot)
  • 1 lime, sliced
  • 1 package frozen strawberries
  • 1 package frozen raspberries
  • peach nectar, optional, to taste

Add fruit to red wine. Refrigerate. Drink! This one was super easy. The lime added a really strong but unique flavor. I think I ended up pouring some extra peach nectar into it eventually too, but the sweet merlot was so sweet on its own, it really didn’t need too much added to it.
I’ve also seen a lot of red wine sangria recipes with oranges and other citrus fruits. The lime gave it such a strong flavor, I can’t imagine what adding more citrus fruits would do.
sangria
The beauty of sangria is that it’s practically foolproof. Even though I have these recipes, the next time I make it (and don’t worry, there will be a next time) I’ll probably use a different combination of fruit, juice and wine. I’ve had versions with peach schnapps, some with club soda, the combinations are endless.
By the way, the third bottle was really a mishmash of all of the above. It was heavy on the red wine, sans the lime, and I added a can of drained pineapple chunks. Still tasty.
Foolproof I tell ya!
What’s your favorite kind of sangria? What fruit/juice/ingredient combos do you use?
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12 thoughts on “sangria in the house

  1. Pingback: goat cheese + prosciutto crostini (recipe) | stuff steph does

  2. Pingback: pasta primavera | stuff steph does

  3. …can’t have the Sangria (allergic to grapes…tragic, I know), but LOVE the Patron bottles. I don’t wait for a bartender to toss them; I empty my own…and use them for water vessels at dinner parties or flower vases. Anyway: pretty pics 😉

  4. Pingback: Drunken Fruit « homemadeadventure

    • If it is cut into small enough pieces it comes out ok, otherwise the slices of fruit do get caught in the bottom and you end having to fish for them with a spoon.

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